Rachel Timmins - Jewelry Artist, Metalsmith, Mixed Media Artist

I met Rachel very briefly at the Society of North American Goldsmith’s conference in Seattle, WA through my instructor at the time, Keith Lewis. 
She has many many body modifications and, according to her artist statement, she uses her art to transport people to the way she experiences life. (Click the link above for her website and her About page.)
Much of her work is extremely colorful, glittery, soft, squishy. Her statement also says she uses comfort as inspiration. 
After looking through her work, I came to identify with it. I wasn’t sure at first, but I find myself wanting (badly) to touch, squish, caress and other wise experience her art. 
The piece I chose here, a small pillow with scalloped grey and cream ruffles, and itself adorned with golden threads, is called Comfort Four and can be viewed in person at the Snyderman-Works Gallery in Philadelphia. 
I have a deep and resounding love for ruffles. They make me happy, caressing them is indeed comforting. I want to wear this brooch and in times of anxiety, pet it for calm. 

Rachel Timmins - Comfort Four - Back

Rachel Timmins - Jewelry Artist, Metalsmith, Mixed Media Artist

I met Rachel very briefly at the Society of North American Goldsmith’s conference in Seattle, WA through my instructor at the time, Keith Lewis. 

She has many many body modifications and, according to her artist statement, she uses her art to transport people to the way she experiences life. (Click the link above for her website and her About page.)

Much of her work is extremely colorful, glittery, soft, squishy. Her statement also says she uses comfort as inspiration. 

After looking through her work, I came to identify with it. I wasn’t sure at first, but I find myself wanting (badly) to touch, squish, caress and other wise experience her art. 

The piece I chose here, a small pillow with scalloped grey and cream ruffles, and itself adorned with golden threads, is called Comfort Four and can be viewed in person at the Snyderman-Works Gallery in Philadelphia. 

I have a deep and resounding love for ruffles. They make me happy, caressing them is indeed comforting. I want to wear this brooch and in times of anxiety, pet it for calm. 

biostar:

“Paint” brooch by Moko Kobayashi - Gallery deux poissons

biostar:

“Paint” brooch by Moko Kobayashi - Gallery deux poissons

beautifulhorsemeat:

German rosary, ivory and silver with partially gilded mounts, ca.1500–1525

isithotinhere:

Pretty Pest
Carolyn A Buss
Sterling silver, stainless steel, fishing line

Dahlia is 3” diameter, sterling silver, pierced and sawn by hand with a 6/0 saw blade. The earwig is nine separate pieces, each leg and antennae are separate pieces. The body and legs of the earwig are made using a technique called chasing and repousse by which the artist uses pitch, a chasing hammer and chasing tools to sort of push and pull the metal into complicated or simple shapes not possible using other methods. Antennae were filed by hand and soldered on. Legs are chased and attached in the underside of the earwig through tiny jump rings with tiny tube and fishing line. It is a brooch with a double pin on the back.

I love this work because I am also intrigued by the workability of the mechanisms, but, as she says, she takes those functions out of their practical application and makes them fun instead.  The way she uses words to accentuate the focus is lovely.  

Berkeley Brown Artist Statement:

My jewellery is inspired by the value of food in our society; I am intrigued by the way our relationship to it allows food to transcend its practical role as nourishment, becoming passion, desire, comfort, metaphor, art, chore, social interaction, delight, tradition, or profession. My interest in these issues has led me to make jewellery that comments on them, creating pieces to adorn ourselves in our passions for cooking and food. 

Using the aesthetics of cooking utensils, abstracting their function and form, I explore our relationship to food in daily life. We relate to food through the utensils we use to make and eat it and these objects’ beauty of design and function inform my work. 

My inspiration is in part drawn from philosophical and humorous writings on food and cooking which reflect the passion of the author and carry food into all areas of life. 
 
I encourage personal response and interaction: Paper and text reference the passion surrounding food as expressed in food writing and moving parts allow the wearer to interact with the pieces. Though my jewellery is informed by the mechanics of utensils, I leave the practicalities of the original utensil behind, instead creating functional jewellery. Connections, movement, clean lines and repeating forms are all brought into my work.

(All images credited to the artist.)

Copper, Urethane, Aluminum, Cubic Zirconia
Created for COSTUME COSTUME II, Sienna Gallery
Katie Poterala Artist Statement

I am intrigued by the irony of and differences between perceived and intrinsic value.
My work is an attempt to exploit the boundary between valuable and invaluable, providethe viewer with a universally accessible place of departure, and to provoke a dialogue about values and perception.
Recognizable forms reference objects of understood or accepted value. Jewelry objects, although familiar, are altered to become introspective and uncommon. Modifications, mutations, and unexpected surfaces and appendages call into question our concept of the precious, the significance and value of bodily adornment, and the social values that drive both. Both the body and familial objects and environments act as hosts, providing a context that addresses the importance of place and image: specific concerns that motivate the values we possess.
-Katie Poterala

Copper, Urethane, Aluminum, Cubic Zirconia

Created for COSTUME COSTUME II, Sienna Gallery

Katie Poterala Artist Statement

I am intrigued by the irony of and differences between perceived and intrinsic value.

My work is an attempt to exploit the boundary between valuable and invaluable, providethe viewer with a universally accessible place of departure, and to provoke a dialogue about values and perception.

Recognizable forms reference objects of understood or accepted value. Jewelry objects, although familiar, are altered to become introspective and uncommon. Modifications, mutations, and unexpected surfaces and appendages call into question our concept of the precious, the significance and value of bodily adornment, and the social values that drive both. Both the body and familial objects and environments act as hosts, providing a context that addresses the importance of place and image: specific concerns that motivate the values we possess.

-Katie Poterala

corigami:

mexandthecity:

DIEGO: Corazon Huichol is a thing of beauty. 

I miss my beading days.


I do not know who made this, but it is beautiful.

corigami:

mexandthecity:

DIEGO: Corazon Huichol is a thing of beauty. 

I miss my beading days.

I do not know who made this, but it is beautiful.

This piece, Diamond Slice Necklace, by Sarah Enterline is displayed in the Velvet da Vinci Gallery in San Francisco, CA for her exhibition “Pretty Crude,” on display from September 14 through October 16, 2011.


Artists’ Reception, Friday, September 16, 6-8 pmSandra Enterline’s work has been a part of Velvet da Vinci for many years. It is easily recognizable, perforated by mind-boggling numbers of meticulously drilled holes in the surface of otherwise clean, minimal pieces. Each piece creates complex shadows and silhouettes, working with and never against the light that pierces through it. In this new collection of work she goes beyond these windows of perforations to create space and capture light with diamonds. Using diamond slices, she suspends them in crude, industrial settings to allow the light to pass through each piece. Light and space are as much a material in this work as the gold, oxidized silver, and diamonds will be.
Sandra Enterline statement:I have created a series of pieces that is about preciousness. The materials that I have chosen to incorporate into the work are precious: diamonds, petroleum and panned gold. Each substance is appealing in its own way. The diamond slices are organic in shape and flawed with inclusions and streaks of grey, black and yellow. The petroleum is dark amber, gritty and rich in color and consistency. The gold flakes are delicate — floating in liquid like particles in a snow globe. These materials are from and embody the earth. They all share a precious existence. The panned gold and the petroleum harken back to a simpler time. Explorers would spend their time in rivers in hopes of capturing the tiny flecks of treasure in their metal pans. I siphoned the petroleum directly from Drake Well in Titusville, Pennsylvania, a few miles from where I was born. Discovered in 1859, it is the first oil well in North America. This oil is sentimental to me, as well as a curiously beautiful substance. At the time oil was discovered at Drake Well, there was an optimistic sentiment in the world. However, today, oil, diamonds and gold are synonymous with war, destruction of the natural environment, wealth, power, and fear.I have chosen labware/ampules to house some of the materials, specifically the oil and the gold. This is a reference to science. I want them to look like specimens that a researcher might analyze and ponder the specifics of quality and purity of the substance contained wthin. I am also revisiting my souvenir project from a decade ago.Ultimately, I am searching for the materials in the jewelry to be harmonious and perplexing at the same time. They fit for right now, and they fit a distant past. I wish for them to be both simple and complex. The story is to be put together by the wearer.

This piece, Diamond Slice Necklace, by Sarah Enterline is displayed in the Velvet da Vinci Gallery in San Francisco, CA for her exhibition “Pretty Crude,” on display from September 14 through October 16, 2011.

Artists’ Reception, Friday, September 16, 6-8 pm

Sandra Enterline’s work has been a part of Velvet da Vinci for many years. It is easily recognizable, perforated by mind-boggling numbers of meticulously drilled holes in the surface of otherwise clean, minimal pieces. Each piece creates complex shadows and silhouettes, working with and never against the light that pierces through it. In this new collection of work she goes beyond these windows of perforations to create space and capture light with diamonds. Using diamond slices, she suspends them in crude, industrial settings to allow the light to pass through each piece. Light and space are as much a material in this work as the gold, oxidized silver, and diamonds will be.


Sandra Enterline statement:

I have created a series of pieces that is about preciousness. The materials that I have chosen to incorporate into the work are precious: diamonds, petroleum and panned gold. Each substance is appealing in its own way. The diamond slices are organic in shape and flawed with inclusions and streaks of grey, black and yellow. The petroleum is dark amber, gritty and rich in color and consistency. The gold flakes are delicate — floating in liquid like particles in a snow globe. These materials are from and embody the earth. They all share a precious existence. 

The panned gold and the petroleum harken back to a simpler time. Explorers would spend their time in rivers in hopes of capturing the tiny flecks of treasure in their metal pans. I siphoned the petroleum directly from Drake Well in Titusville, Pennsylvania, a few miles from where I was born. Discovered in 1859, it is the first oil well in North America. This oil is sentimental to me, as well as a curiously beautiful substance. At the time oil was discovered at Drake Well, there was an optimistic sentiment in the world. However, today, oil, diamonds and gold are synonymous with war, destruction of the natural environment, wealth, power, and fear.

I have chosen labware/ampules to house some of the materials, specifically the oil and the gold. This is a reference to science. I want them to look like specimens that a researcher might analyze and ponder the specifics of quality and purity of the substance contained wthin. I am also revisiting my souvenir project from a decade ago.

Ultimately, I am searching for the materials in the jewelry to be harmonious and perplexing at the same time. They fit for right now, and they fit a distant past. I wish for them to be both simple and complex. The story is to be put together by the wearer.

The Parameters of “Jewelryness”

Taken from the “Looking I” assignment sheet, written by Keith Lewis:

Is jewelry valuable/interesting/beautiful because it is made of valuable/interesting/beautiful materials?

Or are materials made valuable/interesting/beautiful because they are transformed by being made into jewelry?

And why should jewelry be beautiful anyway?

[…]

Is a harness jewelry for a horse?  What if a person wears a horse harness?  Is it jewelry then? Is a necklace still a necklace if it is 14 feet long? [Is it jewelry if it drags behind you as you walk?  What if it is too heavy to walk with? (lecture)]

[…]

Does jewelry say anything?  If so: What?  Is it a form of Art? Craft? Something else? [Author: Design?]

[…] 

Select images of three to five pieces of jewelry.  Jewelry that you like.  Jewelry that you hate.  Jewelry that amuses you.  Jewelry that confuses you.  

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